Donate

PHADon is walking an additional 1000 miles for Pulmonary Hypertension Association! After his landmark walk across America this last summer where he walked 3000 miles from Washington to Maryland, he celebrated his 80th birthday in January and is walking now in his local area of King and Pierce counties of Western Washington.

Pulmonary Hypertension is high blood pressure in the coronary artery which damages the heart and lungs. It makes it difficult for one to breathe, necessitating the need for oxygen – in extreme cases expensive medications are used just to maintain life. At times the only cure is organ transplant. Thousands of people in America of all ages are suffering with PH and struggle every day just to breathe!

Remember: “IF YOU CAN’T BREATHE, NOTHING ELSE MATTERS!” Please give below or click on the PH image to your left to Pulmonary Hypertension Association for support and research!

The video below is from his walk this last summer across America.

Please click on the Donate button below to donate to this worthy cause.

FB Tab

Thank you for supporting Pulmonary Hypertension Association. Your contribution is greatly appreciated. All donations are tax deductible.

If you like to send a check instead, write your check to Pulmonary Hypertension Assn. On the memory line, write “Pacing Parson Walk.” Mail to:                         801 Roeder Rd, Suite 1000, Silver Springs, MD 20910

More info on PH:

Pulmonary hypertension is a rare, complex and often misunderstood and misunderstood and misdiagnosed disease. It is a chronic and progressive disease in which the walls of the arteries of the lungs become narrowed and stiff, and when left untreated can lead to heart failure and ultimately death. Patients with PH have symptoms such as shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue, chest pain, fainting, and swelling of the arms, legs or abdomen. These symptoms resemble other common illnesses such as asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, which makes PH difficult for doctors to detect. Because of these common symptoms, awareness of pulmonary hypertension is crucial.